• Fall 2021

     

    3 NJIT credits



    Course Description

    HUM101 is an introduction to college-level writing. In this course, students are introduced to writing’s rhetorical dimensions; they are asked to consider the purpose, audience, occasion, and genre that are called for in a variety of writing, speaking, or visual assignments. The course also focuses on the writing processes, asking students to brainstorm topics, to write drafts, and to revise their writing based on reflection and peer feedback. Writing and reading go hand-in-hand, so students are asked to read challenging articles, essays, and prose, and to consider paintings, films, or other visual compositions. Academic writing begins from the assumption that written, visual and spoken texts can be in conversation with each other. Thus, the readings serve as both models of effective communication and as beginning places for students’ own arguments and analyses.



    Instructor

     

    Ms. Randi Metsch-Ampel

    ST 14-1 Meeting Times: Monday, 11:40-12:20 PM; Wednesday, 11AM-12:20 PM; Friday, 11:00-12:20 PM 

    ST 14-2 Meeting Times: Monday, 11:00-11:40 AM, Tuesday, 8:20-9:40 AM, Thursday, 8:20-9:40 AM

    Email: metschra@orange.k12.nj.us

    Office Hours: 3:30-4:30 PM, Tuesday through Friday and by appointment.



    Prerequisites

    Successful completion of The American Experience: English I (Honors) and Political Studies: English II (Honors)

     

    Course Goals

     

    During this course, you will:

    • Gain knowledge of writing’s rhetorical dimensions
    • Use writing as a tool for critical thinking and reflection
    • Practice writing as a process by using various brainstorming, invention, revision, and editing strategies
    • Write in several genres that utilize analysis, reflection, narrative, critique, and argument skills
    • Practice using the conventions of written, spoken and visual composition
    • Practice writing and creating in digital environments

     

    Required Texts

    This course uses open educational resources (OER). All resources are listed on the course schedule and posted on Google Classroom.

    • Writer’s Handbook = WH (https://2012books.lardbucket.org/books/writers-handbook/
    • Writing Spaces = WS (Open Textbook Chapters - http://writingspaces.org/essays/)
    • Access to The Purdue OWL Writing Lab ( https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html)
    • A variety of handouts

     

    Required Materials

     

    • One 3-Subject College-Ruled Notebook, pens, pencils,  highlighters, one 2-pocket folders, Chromebook

     

     

    Assignments & Assessments

    Homework 10%

    Participation (Class work) 20%

    In-Class Writings/Quizzes (Formative Assessments) 20%

    Essays w/Process Pages (Summative Assessments) 25%

    Tests & Presentations w/Reflective Writing 25%

     

    Individual and group work will be evaluated according to the university’s grading scale.

     

    A 100-90

    B+ 89-87

    B 86-80

    C+ 79-77

    C 76-70

    D 69-60

    F 59-0

     

    Attendance

    Attendance is crucial in this class. To attend class is to be present, alert, and a participant in discussions and activities. Please be punctual. If you arrive to class five minutes late, you will be marked late. Three late marks will equal one absence. Three unexcused absences will significantly threaten your final grade.




    Read and Respond (R&R)/Dialectical Journal

    1. Quotes-n-Notes: Create a 2 column Response Journal (RJ) by drawing a line down the center of a blank page of your journal (Some of you might have a dialectical notebook which already has a line down the middle of each page). At the top of the page, write down the name of the text and the author. Then, on the left side, note passages that intrigued and/or puzzled you. Place them in quotation marks and copy them word for word. On the right side of the line, write down your responses to those selections.
    2. Key Words & Phrases: Look over the text and identify any words that you believe are important to understand the main points/arguments of the writing. Create a list of these words, defining any that you are unfamiliar with.
    3. Question/Comment: Devise at least one question or comment about the text. If you like, you can even address the writer directly.

     

    In-Class Writings

    During regular class meetings, students will complete in-class writing assessments. These assessments will be based on materials and topics addressed in class. They will cover content as well as vocabulary (definitions of terms & their use in context). 

     

    Process Page

    The process page is a one-page cover sheet required for the final draft of each of the summative assessments (essays). The process page should describe the overall process of writing the essay. It is an opportunity to emphasize what you feel the strengths of the paper are. It is also a place for you to document the challenges you encountered from draft to draft. Below is a list of questions that the process page should address:

    • Restate the assignment.
    • What do you believe to be the strengths of your paper?
    • What challenges did you face?
    • To what extent did the peer review sessions help you with your writing process?
    • What have you learned from writing this paper?
    • What specific areas of improvement will you focus on for the next paper?

     

    Synchronous Instruction

    If we engage in remote learning, students will be muted and unmuted when they raise their hand during synchronous instruction. Video sharing is encouraged, but not required, unless specified by administration. Students will be asked to participate regularly through the utilization of “nonverbal feedback" in instances when your camera may be off.  If you do not share your video and fail to respond to a question during synchronous instruction, points will be taken off your participation/classwork grade. Repeated instances will be reported to administration. If you need a break, you must notify the teacher, so they are aware you stepped away from the computer and do not mark you as non-participatory.

     

    Assignment Submission

    Missing and incomplete assignments can be viewed on Genesis. If absent, each student will have two days to make up a missing assignment. After that, a 5-point penalty will be taken off any assignment for each day it is late. If a student is not absent, but failed to complete an assignment, they may request an extension by speaking with the instructor. A 5-point penalty may be taken off the assignment for every day it is not turned in. For example, a homework or classwork assignment that is late for a period of 5 school days without being excused, is only eligible to receive a maximum score of 75. Additionally, your parent/guardian will be contacted when you miss an assignment and administration will be notified. Excessive missing assignments will result in disciplinary action. 

     

    NJIT University Code on Academic Integrity

    The New Jersey Institute of Technology is an institution dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through teaching and research. We expect our graduates to assume positions of leadership within their professions and communities. Honesty in your academic work will develop into professional integrity.

     

    The NJIT Code of Academic Integrity embodies a spirit of mutual trust and intellectual honesty that is central to the very nature of the university and represents the highest possible expression of shared values among the members of the university.

     

    All assignments submitted shall be considered “graded work” and all aspects of your coursework are covered by the Code on Academic Integrity. All projects and homework assignments are to be completed individually unless otherwise specified. 

     

    The full text of the NJIT University Code on Academic Integrity can be found at www.njit.edu/education/pdf/academic-integrity-code-pdf.

     

    SEMESTER SCHEDULE (Subject to Change)

    • Be sure to check Google Classroom regularly for announcements and changes
    • For assigned readings, look for these abbreviations: WH = Writer’s Handbook & GC = Google Classroom



    UNIT ONE:  INTRODUCTION TO RHETORIC, COLLEGE WRITING & LITERACY NARRATIVE

     

    Introduction to the Course

    Defining Humanities & Humanities 101, Close Reading of Course Description, Review of Assignment

    Reading: Read/Review Syllabus.

    Writing: 1. Look up/define terms (handout).

     

    Student Introductions, Review of Syllabus & Relevant Terms.

    Review of Syllabus & Discussion of Relevant Terms. Student Interviews & Presentations. Review of Assignment (with modeling of the Read and Respond Format)

    Reading: “What is Academic Writing?”

    Writing: 1. Complete a “Read and Respond” (R&R). The format is provided on the syllabus (see above).

     

    What is Academic Writing?

    Read Around Small Group Work, Small Group Reporting Out, Whole Class Synthesis of Main Points. In-Class Diagnostic.

    Reading: Read “How To Read Like A Writer” by Mike Bunn and “talk back to the page.” 

    Writing: Complete a Read and Respond.

       

    What is Rhetoric? 

    Civil Rhetoric vs. Propaganda

    Rhetoric appeals

     

    Read Like a Writer

    Small Group Work

    Whole Class Discussion

    Reading: “Superman and Me” (Sherman Alexie)

    Reading: “If Black English Isn’t a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is?” (James Baldwin)

    Writing: See Google Classroom (GC)

     

    Read Like A Writer

    Applying Bunn’s close reading techniques. Discussion of “Superman and Me”

    And “If Black English Isn’t a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is?”

    Reading: Reading Assignment: “Critical Thinking in College Writing: From the Personal to the Academic” (Gita Dasbender)

    Writing: See GC

     

    Critical Thinking

    Using Dasbender’s techniques. Rewind! Recap of Weeks 1 & 2

    Review for In-Class Writing 1 

    LANGUAGE AND IDENTITY








     

    Diagnostic In-Class Writing 1

    Readings: 

    “Eleven,” Sandra Cisneros

    “Superman & Me,” Sherman Alexie

    “Mother Tongue,” Amy Tan

    “How To Tame A Wild Tongue”

    “Coming to an Awareness of Language”(Malcolm X)



       

    Literacy Narrative Essay Options

    Discussion of “Mother Tongue”& “Coming to an Awareness of Language”

    Review of Literacy Narrative Essay Assignment

    Reading: Chapter 6 “Drafting” WH

    Writing: Create an initial draft

    A hard copy of the first draft must be brought to class.

       

    Writing Workshop  – Small Group Critique 1


    Writing: See GC

     

    Writing Workshop  – Small Group Critique 2

    Reading: “ Meaning Clear: The Logic of Revision” (Donald M. Murray) WS

    Writing: See GC

     

    Writing Workshop 

    Revision

    Writing: See GC

       

    In-Class Writing 2

    Writing: See GC

     

    Citing Sources: MLA Style, 

    Intro to Purdue OWL Writing LabEssay Checklists  & Proofreading

    Due: Essay 1 – Literacy Narrative

    Writing: Complete the final draft of Literacy Narrative, with process page

     

    Introductory Discussion

    In-Class Reading Session



    Reading:“Backpacks vs. Briefcases: Steps toward Rhetorical Analysis” (Laura Bolin Carroll)

    Reading: “I Am A Fugitive Slave”(Jermain Wesley Logan)

    Reading: “What, to the Slave, is the Fourth of July?” 

    Excerpt from “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass,” Frederick Douglass

    Reading: “Ain’t I A Woman?” (Sojourner Truth)

         
     

    Rhetorical Situation & Analysis

    Logos, Ethos, Pathos

    SOAPSTone Strategies

    Small Group Work

    Reading

    Writing: See GC

     

    Rhetorical Situation & Analysis

    Discussion of Speeches

    Review Session in preparation for In-Class Writing 3



    Visual Rhetoric; rhetorical analysis



    Reading:“What it Means to be Colored in the Capital of the United States” (Mary Church Terrell)

    Reading: “This Awful Slaughter” (Ida B. Wells)


    (Branded content, Super Bowl ad, YouTube commercial analysis & advertisement analysis)

    Creation of original visual rhetoric

    UNIT TWO: RHETORICAL ANALYSIS: (“Everything's an Argument”)

     

    In-Class Writing 3

    Reading: Bethune, Mary McLeod. “What Does Democracy Mean to Me?”

    Reading: Marshall, Thurgood. “The Constitution: A Living Document”

     

    The Genre of Speech

    Reading: “The Black Woman in Contemporary America” (Shirley Chisholm)


    Florence Kelley’s 1905 speech to the Suffragette Conference

    Reading: “I Have A Dream” (Martin Luther King, Jr.


    Writing: See GC

     

    Speech Presentation

    Listening/Viewing Session: “I Have A Dream” speech & speech set to music* 

    Reading:

    “A More Perfect Union,” Barack Obama

     “Knox College Commencement Address” (Barack Obama)

    Writing: See GC

       

    “Everything’s an Argument” &

    Rhetoric in the 2021st Century


    “Only a Pawn in Their Game,” Bob Dylan

    Studs Terke’s Interview with C.P. Ellis

    Reading: “On the Pulse of Morning” (Maya Angelou)

    Writing: See GC

    Film: Thirteenth

    New York Times series: “Conversations on Race”

    “Hyphen-Nation” 

    Moth Story:  “Homecoming King,” Hasan Minhaj

    Ted Talk: “We Need to Talk About Injustice,” Bryan Stevenson

    Poetry: “A Small Needful Fact,” Ross Gay

    “My Papa’s Waltz,” Theodore Reothke

    Satire: “Plague of Tics,” David Sedaris

       

    Rhetorical Analysis of speeches and various media

     

    Rhetorical Analysis Essay Options

    Writing Workshop

    Writing: See GC

       

    Writing Workshop

    Writing: See GC

     

    Writing Workshop

    Writing: Final Draft is due at start of next class.

       

    UNIT THREE: THINKING ABOUT TECHNOLOGY - ARGUMENTATION

       

    Due: Essay 2-Rhetorical Analysis

    TBD

    Writing: “Does the Internet Make You Smarter?” (Clay Shirky)

     

    What Makes a Strong Argument?

    Reading:“Is Google Making Us Stupid?”(Nicholas Carr)

    Writing: See GC

    Reading: “Study Finds Gender and Skin-type Bias in Commercial Artificial Intelligence Systems,” Science Daily

    “Amazon Scraps Secret AI Recruiting Tool That Showed Bias Against Women,” Jeffrey Dastin (Reuters)

     

    Thinking About Technology

    Reading: “Laptops Are Great. But Not During a Lecture or a Meeting” (Susan Dynarski)

    Writing: See GC

       

    In-Class Writing 4

    Reading: “Our teenagers need social skills, not social networks” (Christina Patterson)

    Writing: See GC

     

    Thinking About Technology

    Reading: “From Pencils to Pixels” (Dennis Baron)

    Writing: See GC

     

    Thinking About Technology

    Reading: “The Reader and Technology” (Toby Litt)

    Writing: See GC

       

    Thinking About Technology

     
     

    Argumentative Essay Options

    Writing Workshop

    Writing: See GC

    John McWhorter on a , “Post-Racial America”

       
       

    Writing Workshop

    Writing: See GC

     

    Writing Workshop

    Writing: See GC

     

    Writing Workshop

    Writing: See GC

    UNIT FOUR: – MINI RESEARCH PAPER

       

    Final Proofreading/Editing Session

    Review of MLA Style Citations via Purdue OWL Writing Lab

    Writing: Complete the final draft of Essay – Argumentative Essay (+ Process Page)

     

    Due: Essay 3-Argumentative Essay/Mini Research Paper

    Background Info/Context on 

    In-Class Reading

    Reading: See GC

    Writing: See GC




    Ted Talk, Moth Story, etc...

     

    Discussion Leaders

    Reading: See GC

    Writing: See GC

       

    Discussion Leaders

    Reading: See GC

    Writing: See GC

     

    Discussion Leaders

    Reading: See GC

    Writing: See GC

     

    Process Writing – Draft Development

    Peer Review Sessions – Small Group Critique

    Process Writing - Draft Revision

    Writing: See GC

       

    Due: Essay 4 – Mini Research Paper

    UNIT FIVE: CRITICAL BOOKS REVIEW

       

    Individual Student Check-ins

     



     

    Critical Review

    Reading: See GC

    Writing:

     

    Critical Review

    Reading: See GC

     

    Critical Review 

    Reading: See GC




     

    Due: Critical Book Review

    Intro to Critical Film Review

    Reading: See GC

    Writing: See GC

     

    Critical Film Review

    Reading: See GC

    Writing: See GC

     

    Critical Film Review

    Writing: See GC




       
     

    Critical Film Review

    Writing: See GC

     

    Critical Film Review

    Writing: See GC




     

    Presentations – Critical Film Review

    Writing: See GC

     

    Presentations – Critical Film Create Original RhetoricReview

    Writing: See GC




    Spring Schedule to be Provided: Create Original Rhetoric



    ACADEMIC WRITING TEXTS

     

    • Carroll, Laura Bolin. “Backpacks vs. Briefcases: Steps toward Rhetorical Analysis”
    • Irvin, L. Lennie. “What is ‘Academic’ Writing?”
    • Lessner & Craig. “Finding Your Way In”
    • Murray, Donald M. “Making Meaning Clear: The Logic of Revision”

    LANGUAGE & IDENTITY (LITERACY) TEXTS

    • Sandra Cisneros, “Eleven”
    • Alexie, Sherman. “Superman and Me”
    • Anzaldua, Gloria. “How to Tame a Wild Tongue” 
    • Baldwin, James. “If Black English Isn’t a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is?”
    • Klass, Perri. “HERS”
    • Shen, Fan. “The Classroom and the Wider Culture: Identity as a Key to Learning English Composition”
    • Silko, Leslie Marmon. “Language and Literature from a Pueblo Indian Perspective”
    • Tan, Amy. “Mother Tongue” 
    • X, Malcolm. “Coming to an Awareness of Language” 

     

    RHETORICAL ANALYSIS TEXTS

    • Angelou, “On the Pulse of Morning”
    • Bethune, Mary McLeod. “What Does Democracy Mean to Me?”
    • Chisholm, Shirley.”The Black Woman in Contemporary America”
    • Crummel, “The Black Woman of the South: Her Neglects and her Needs”
    • Dylan, “Only a Pawn in Their Game”
    • Douglass, Frederick. “What, to the Slave, is the Fourth of July?”
    • DuBois, W.E.B. “To the Nations of the World”
    • Du Vernay, Ava. Thirteenth
    • Kelley, Florence. “Child Labor & Women’s Suffrage”
    • Gay, Ross. “Some Thoughts on Mercy”
    • Kennedy, John F. “1961 Inaugural Address”
    • King, Jr., Martin Luther. “I Have A Dream”
    • Loguen, Jermain Wesley. “I am a Fugitive Slave”
    • Noah, Trevor. Excerpts from Born a Crime
    • Obama, Barack. “Knox College Commencement Address”
    • Obama, Barack. “A More Perfect Union”
    • Marshall, Thurgood. “The Constitution: A Living Document”
    • Sedaris, David. “Plague of Tics”
    • Staples, Brent. “Just Walk on By”
    • Stevenson, Bryan, “We Need to Talk About Injustice”
    • Terrell, Mary Church. “What it Means to be Colored in the Capital of the United States”
    • Truth, Sojourner. “Ain’t I A Woman?”
    • Washington, Booker T. “Atlanta Exposition Address”
    • Wells-Barnett, Ida B. “This Awful Slaughter”

     

    THINKING ABOUT TECHNOLOGY TEXTS

    • Baron, Dennis. “From Pencils to Pixels” 
    • Carr, Nicholas. “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”
    • Dynaski, Susan. “Laptops Are Great. But Not During a Lecture or Meeting”
    • Gladwell, Malcolm. “Why the Revolution Will Not Be ReTweeted”
    • Litt, Toby. “The Reader and Technology”
    • Patterson, Christina. “Our teenagers need social skills, not social networks”
    • Shirky, Clay. “Does the Internet Make Us Smarter?”
    • “The Impact of Social Media Use on Social Skills” (NY Behavioral Health)
    • “Amazon Scraps Secret AI Recruiting Tool That Showed Bias Against Women,” Jeffrey Dastin (Reuters)
    • “Study Finds Gender and Skin-type Bias in Commercial Artificial Intelligence Systems,” Science Daily





    We, the undersigned student and parent/guardian, have reviewed the expectations of the class/course outlined in the syllabus and accept the terms and expectations as laid out.

     

    I, as the student, further understand that my parent/guardian may be contacted if I am found to be in default of my expectations, solely for the purpose of correcting the problem before my grades are put in jeopardy.




     

     (student signature) (printed name) (date)

     

     

     

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    • Yes
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