• Unit 1 Plan

    In this unit of study, students develop and use modelsplan and conduct investigationsuse mathematical thinking, and construct explanations and design solutions as they develop an understanding of the substructure of atoms and to provide more mechanistic explanations of the properties of substances. Students also apply an understanding of the process of optimization and engineering design to chemical reaction systems. The crosscutting concepts of patterns, energy and matter, and stability and change are the organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in developing and using modelsplanning and conducting investigationsusing mathematical thinking, and constructing explanations and designing solutions. This unit addresses Big Idea 1: The chemical elements are fundamental building materials of matter, and all matter can be understood in terms of arrangement of atoms.  These atoms retain their identity in chemical reactions, and Big Idea 2: Chemical and physical properties of materials can be explained by the structure and the arrangement of atoms, ions, or molecules and the forces between them.This unit is based on HS-PS1-1,  HS-PS1-3, HS-PS1-7, HS-PS1-4, HS-PS1-5, and HS-ETS1-2.

     

    Comments (-1)
  • Unit 2 Plan

    In this unit of study, students develop and using modelsplan and conduct investigationsuse mathematical thinking, analyze and interpret data, and construct explanations and design solutions make sense of the relationships between substances in a balanced chemical reaction through stoichiometry. They will also use the findings of investigations involving aqueous solutions to further study this relationship. There are three main types of reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. These are precipitation reactions, acid-base reactions and redox reactions. Precipitation and acid-base reactions are sometimes known as ion exchange reactions. Ion exchange reactions also include gas forming reactions. Ion exchange reactions are a type of reaction where the positive ions exchange their respective negative ions due to a driving force. A precipitate is formed when ions in solution react with each other to form an insoluble product. Solubility rules help to identify the precipitate that has been formed. A number of tests can be used to identify whether certain anions (chlorides, bromides, iodides, carbonates, sulphates) are present in a solution. An acid-base reaction is one in which an acid reacts with a base to form a salt and water. A redox reaction is one in which electrons are transferred from one substance to another. Students also apply an understanding of the process of optimization and engineering design to chemical reaction systems. The crosscutting concepts of patterns, energy and matter, systems, and stability and change are the organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in developing and using modelsplanning and conducting investigationsusing mathematical thinking, analyze and interpret data, and constructing explanations and designing solutions. This unit addresses Big Idea 4: Rates of chemical reactions are determined by details of the molecular collisions, and Big Idea 5: The laws of thermodynamics describe the essential role of energy and explain and predict the direction of changes in matter. This unit is based on HS-PS1-7, HS-PS1-2, HS-PS3-1, HS-PS3-2, HS-PS3-3, HS-PS3-4, and HS-ETS1-2

    Comments (-1)
  • Unit 3 Plan

    In this unit of study, students develop and using modelsplan and conduct investigationsuse mathematical thinking, analyze and interpret data, and construct explanations and design solutions to understand the effect that electrons have on the physical and chemical properties of matter. The theory of quantum mechanics explains the behavior of particles, such as photons and electrons on the atomic and subatomic realm. The wave-particle nature of light is quantified in Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle, which states that there is limit to how well we can know both the position electron (associated with the electron’s particle nature), and the velocity times the mass of an electron ((associated with the electron’s wave nature)- the more accurately one is measured, the greater the uncertainty in the measurement. Quantum mechanics explains the periodic table by describing how electrons full the quantum mechanical orbitals within the atoms that compose the elements. An electron configuration for an atom shows which quantum mechanical orbitals the atom’s electrons occupy. For example, the electron configuration for helium is 1s2, which indicates that helium’s two electrons occupy the 1s orbital. The most stable electron configurations are those with full s and p sublevels, like the noble gases. Elements will bond with other elements by sharing or transferring electrons in order complexly fill their s and p sublevels. The way in which the electrons are dispersed between the atoms determines the bond type. In ionic bonds, electrons are transferred, while in molecular bonds, electrons are shared. Bonding and nonbonding electrons further determine the properties of substances by influencing the molecular shape of molecules. In VSEPR Theory, molecular geometries are determined by the repulsion between electron groups on the central atom. An electron group can be a single bond, double bond, triple bond, lone pair , or even a single electron.  The crosscutting concepts of patterns, energy and matter, systems, and stability and change are the organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas. Students are expected to demonstrate proficiency in developing and using modelsplanning, and conducting investigationsusing mathematical thinking, analyze and interpret data, and constructing explanations and designing solutions. This unit emphasizes Big Idea 3: Changes in matter involve the rearrangement and/or reorganization of atoms and/or the transfer of electrons.

    This unit is based on HS-PS3-1, HS-PS3-2, HS-PS3-3, HS-PS3-4, and HS-ETS1-2

    Comments (-1)
  • Unit 4 Plan

    In this unit of study, students develop and using modelsplan and conduct investigations, and obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information to understand the relationship between intermolecular forces and the properties of matter. The forces that hold molecules or atoms together are called intermolecular forces. The strength of the intermolecular forces in a substance determines its state. These include dispersion forces, dipole-dipole forces, and hydrogen bonding in order of increasing strength. Surface tension results from the tendency of liquids to minimize their surface area to maximize the interactions between their constituent particles, thus lowering their potential energy. Viscosity is a resistance of liquid to flow. Viscosity increases with increasing strength of intermolecular forces and decreases with increasing temperature. The solubility of a substance is the amount of the substance that dissolves in a given amount of a solvent. The solubility of one substance in another depends on the types of intermolecular forces that exist between the substances as well as within each substance. This unit is address Big Idea 6: Any bond or intermolecular attraction that can be formed can be broken.  These two processes are in a dynamic competition, sensitive to initial conditions and external perturbations. This unit is based on HS-PS1-3, HS-PS2-6, and HS-ETS1-2

    Comments (-1)